Beginner looking for advice

Beiträge
15
Ort
Kroatien
Hi Georg, thank you for clarifying my question about big wheels and distances between them. I am beginner in recumbents but Gaucho, Pioneer, Max (Azub) are all touring bikes and have wheels closer.

I'm glad to hear that your'e having fun on your bike in Croatia. I hope I will do the same this summer!

Liegeratt, thank you for info on Pioneer!(y)
I've decided to buy it, it suit's my style of ride, wood trails, asphalt, can carry load, durable frame, comfortable, big tires-to see and to be bee seen in traffic.
 
Beiträge
1.474
Ort
Stuttgart
Liegerad
Sonstiges
I recommend the "aerostuur" bar for its functional advantages and intuitiveness of control. I personally also think it looks good, but not everyone agrees. Best steering option for pushing the bike in a dignified way, and ease of getting on and off.
 
Beiträge
15
Ort
Kroatien
Hi ewok and thanks for recommendation for steering.
You've mentioned some good points- getting on/off, handling intuitiveness, pushing.

I ordered tiller since it looks most comfortable, but I can only guess that I will like it.
Aero bar looks to me as if my hands will get tired from holding them straight and I guess handles can rub on my tigh when turning.
But I have time to change it to aero if you/others help me choose with suggestions.

What do you mean by "intuitiveness of control" compared to tiller control?

Thanks!
 
Beiträge
1.474
Ort
Stuttgart
Liegerad
Sonstiges
Your hands are positioned to the steering axis almost like on a normal bike handlebar. This makes it more intuitive than the tiller that points backwards, inverting the input signal as to left/right.
I find the aero bar gives more control at low speed because of sheer leverage, and of the possibility to shift your weight a bit, pulling yourself sideways. It also helps that it is rigid, this is comparing to a folding tiller which gets awkward in the very tightest of turns (then hinges sideways not lenghtways).
When standing, you can comfortably lean forward to have a better look round the corner of an intersection, resting one arm onto the bar like onto a ... well, a bar, of the type that beer is served over. Or you can stand up and look over the car in front of you to see why the traffic has jammed, the handlebar not being in your way. Rolling start / stop is possible: push off sitting in a lady rider position, swing your leg over and engage pedals while rolling. Reverse for stopping and getting off fluidly.
Parking and locking the bike to things I'd describe as "mostly okay", often you can wrap it round the object (e.g. signpost, bike-parking bars), sometimes you can't and then it will obstruct you. The tiller wins in this regard. Locking will potentially be a bit of a hassle with this frame in any case, choose your lock wisely to make this a non-issue ;)
 
Zuletzt bearbeitet:
Beiträge
15
Ort
Kroatien
Thanks ewok! (y)

I will rather listen you and others, than myself.
I get the" inverting the input signal as to left/right", and other in field examples you mention. Good points.

What's your opinion on aero hitting thigh when turning, does it occur at all, or only at slow speeds? Hands get tired after a while or all ok?

Cheers
Ivan
 
Beiträge
1.474
Ort
Stuttgart
Liegerad
Sonstiges
The handlebar-leg interference in tight turns is hardly a problem, you get the hang of evading that metal tube and taking your turn anyway. A real disadvantage is the possibility to strike your shin on the handlebar, it really hurts. It can happen if you miss the pedal and your leg jolts forwards. Or on bumps. Bacchetta wrap their bikes' handlebars with griptape, maybe this helps a bit.
As shifters you can use a good pair of twist-shifters which is the standard. Another option is using bar-end shifters which you operate with your palms, I was sceptical of this but I find it works fine and is kind of fun to use.
 
Beiträge
1.474
Ort
Stuttgart
Liegerad
Sonstiges
To help your imagination, this is what a wide U-bar (aerobar) like Nazca's looks like when tape-wrapped with the cables running inside. @white_speed
 
Beiträge
15
Ort
Kroatien
Thanks ewok!
Good looks are important but functionality even better. Having both extra!
So will check with forum for ideas before I assemble my bike.

I definitely made an effort and searched on net/youtube for aero bars handling and definitely changed my mind and ordered aero bars.
Found few videos where I could see the effect of tiller steer at slow speed, hands going left-right all the time and wondered how would I feel going downhill/uphill and steer the bike + other situations.

Since I didn't try any of the two I can't say that tiller for some riders isn't good but I will be better off with aero.

So...I have few more questions.
Regarding wheel rims.
I will ride with max 20kg of cargo but only few times a year, alltogether max 100kg.
Rest of rides will be myself and little extra-food, clothes..
Do I need extra strong rims and spokes?
Double wall rims/spokes are ok or I need something extra?

Thaaanks!!!
 
Beiträge
1.474
Ort
Stuttgart
Liegerad
Sonstiges
Hi Ivan,
I'm no wheelbuilding whizz, but hope this general answer helps. Wheels for recumbents need not be stronger than on an upright bike for the same job. You can follow the same advice that good sources will give for wheels for upright touring bikes.
For a bike like yours, I'd use the same number of spokes fore and aft (reasons: evenly laden wheels, rigid fork). And, as always, wide enough rims for the envisioned tyres (-> reference: Sheldon Brown, or the original table by the ETRTO respectively)
 

irg

Beiträge
43
Ort
Graz
Hi Ivan!

Take strong usual rims for daily use, and they will do it. In the wheels of my distance I mounted simple and cheap zac 2000-rims with 36 spokes, and they do their job. Look for enough tension of the spokes, most bicycle-dealer build wheels with too little tension, to spare working time. Don`t take lightweigth-rims, they are not for your purpose. With the weight of our recumbent, a few additional grams are not important.

32 spokes are possible for you, 36 will be better. You can build your wheels by yourself. It´s no woodoo-magic, even if some people tell so. Double wall rims are usually stronger. Look at good spokes, if possible. I use stainless Sapim spokes with 2mm, but you find, like rims, other good spokes too. With hub it´s the same: You don´t need to by extra expensive high end-parts. As a luxury I use normally shimano XT-hubs in our bikes, but you can take deore too. (Only in the tandem I use stronger hubs.)

greetings from actually sunny Graz!
georg
 
Beiträge
15
Ort
Kroatien
Hi Georg:)

And thank you for your answer.
It helps me to decide what to do.
Thank for advice on spokes, tension..

My plan was to take parts from my MTB to save money, since they are working more than well, no reason not to put them.
Xt hub, xt shifter, deore slx brakes, double wall rims it all worked more than fine, no problems at all.
I was not sure though if rims are good enough.

I am so looking forward to go for rides on my new bike.

Enjoy the sun.

Spring is in full swing here, short sleeves..
 
Beiträge
1.474
Ort
Stuttgart
Liegerad
Sonstiges
Do you have experience with clipless pedals? They make a lot of sense on recumbents.
If not, you could get used to them on the upright bike now so you don't have to learn two skills at once.
 
Beiträge
15
Ort
Kroatien
I never tried them. But I know they are more efficient.

It would be hilarious and expensive to try them while learning to ride.

But after I am ok with balance I can try.

Thanks ewok, good idea.
 
Oben